Make yoghurt in a thermos flask (two ingredients)

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In my garden: Kumquat fruit and blossom

 

Natural yoghurt is a probiotic rich food invaluable in assisting normal gut health. It also offers skincare benefits when used topically and can be used straight out of the jar as a facial wash or treatment. And yoghurt is not just for breakfast: It is delicious in cooking, baking, marinades, salad dressings and can even be used as a healthy replacement for oils and butters. 

 

I have been making my own yoghurt on and off for years, and have recently done so with a new enthusiasm since the call to action to reduce plastic and make use of reusables instead of single use plastic containers which are the common packaging for supermarket yoghurt. And as it’s homemade by me, I know exactly what’s in there and can be assured of its wonderful healthy benefits and delicious taste. I try to make eco-wise choices when purchasing the milk that will eventually become my homemade yoghurt. Fresh milk from the Farmers Market is first prize, but this is not always possible. I often buy my milk in large 3 Litre (.793 gallon) containers from PicknPay or Woolworths, which translates into less plastic in the long run. I then dispense the milk into smaller glass bottles which I freeze until needed. (See my post here for more about freezing in glass).

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Frozen milk in bottles

 

 

My Homemade Yoghurt Recipe is adapted from this book on South African cookery which was my cooking bible when I first lived on my own in my early twenties:

Ingredients and Instructions: Heat 250 ml full cream milk to boiling, and remove from the heat when the froth starts to rise. Pour 1 tablespoon of the hot milk into the flask and stir for a few seconds to reduce the heat slightly. Add 1 tablespoon of shop bought or homemade yoghurt to the flask and stir in with the milk. This is now your yoghurt starter. Allow the remaining milk to cool to the correct temperature in one of two ways:

  1. A food thermometer to test to 45°C, OR..
  2. The ‘fingertip test’ as follows: by inserting the little finger for a count of 10, by which time the heat from the milk will ‘sting’ the finger. In my experience it takes at least 6 minutes for the milk to cool, depending on the surrounding temperature.

Now you are ready to add the milk to the yoghurt starter. First remove the skin that might have formed over the milk, pour the milk into the flask and stir it just a few times to blend with the starter. Screw the lid onto the thermos and leave the yoghurt to ‘brew’ for 7-9 hours, or till set. Once set, scoop your yoghurt into a glass jar and refrigerate.

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Delicious, creamy, homemade yoghurt

 

 

The thermos that I use is this food flask below which I bought around twenty years ago when I lived in Cape Town and has been one of my most well utilized kitchen ‘appliances’ since that time. As you can see, it has a wide neck which is perfect for this recipe. I have not yet tried making yoghurt in a drinks flask (the type with a narrow neck), as I find that my food flask is easy to work with and easy to clean afterwards. My flask takes 750ml food or liquid, so I can double up the recipe above if I want a larger quantity.

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My hardworking thermos flask

 

 

Some ideas for cooking with yoghurt:

  • One Yogurt Every Day: Cooking Tips and Recipes
  • Wiki-How: no-cook Yoghurt Cheese ( In the interests of Eco-Wisdom: please pass on the suggestion to use plastic cling wrap at step 9!)

 

 

And its not just for eating... I use it as a facial wash: just use a you would a cleanser or liquid soap: a small handful rubbed gently over damp skin. The yoghurt has a mild abrasive action due to the presence of lactic acids, and is full of healthy proteins, oils and probiotics which benefit the skin. Also great as a conditioning hair treatment.  See here for more ideas:  Yoghurt for DIY skin and hair care.

 

 

Yoghurt is a naturally probiotic rich food. This site offers more information about the health benefits of probiotics and suggests some vegan alternatives to yoghurt.

 

 

 

 

Simple meditation: no yoga mat required

 

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In my garden: Granadilla fruit and flower

Many people today are interested in meditation in a more ‘functional’ way, perhaps as a means to help us to manage stress or health issues and to help us to cope with our busy, demanding lives. Meditation therefore is something we might look to simply as a tool to help us to manage our daily demands.

In his book YOGA (6th Edition_ 1983), Swami Venkatesananda describes meditation as “..the art of realising the universal self, beyond the ego-sense” and as a state of being and awareness where “..the ‘I’ has disappeared and only consciousness remains”  

 

Swami Venkatesananda spent many years as a recluse and ascetic disciple. His yoga practice extended to serving humanity and he believed in teaching through his word and example the ideal of an enlightened life. He believed that there is a way for us all to benefit from a meditation practice and believed in a ‘common sense’ view of our seemingly complex problems.

So how CAN we use meditation in a ‘common sense’ way, in a way that helps us to feel calmer, happier, healthier and more in control of our lives?

I have used my own morning meditation routine as an example of a light meditation practice before starting the day. The practice can take as short a time or as long as you like, even five minutes if that is all you have. I sit for fifteen minutes on average. The important thing is to make it part of your daily routine so that it becomes a habit.

First, I make sure I have a hot cup of tea in my hands and I sit comfortably in bed with my back supported by pillows. The routine is more or less as follows:

Sit with your cup up close so that you can feel the warmth under your nose and between your hands. Breathe gently, noticing the scent and warmth of the steam in your nostrils (coffee will have a strong scent of course). Notice the colour and texture of the fluid and how it contrasts against the inner surface of the cup. Notice whether there are any reflections on the surface, maybe you can see your own eyes mirrored back at you from the surface of the contents. The idea here is just to notice, to observe without judgement or question. Simply notice the sights and sensations of what is in front of you, of what you are holding in your hands. Now bring the cup up closer and take a sip. Notice the feeling of  heat on your lips and tongue,  and the taste and texture of the fluid as it reaches your taste buds. Close your eyes and experience the sensations and the taste of your tea as you continue to gently sip. Pause as you wish and notice other things, such as the sound of the tea being sipped and swallowed, the weight and texture of the cup that you are holding, and the feeling of the breath in the nostrils. The idea is to remain gently focused on the experience of Drinking a Cup of Tea, without the intervention of thoughts about what the day ahead might bring, or about things that happened yesterday. If you find that your mind starts to wander, make sure that you are still sitting comfortably, and gently bring your mind back to the moment. If need be, keep a piece of paper and a pencil close at hand in case something comes to mind that you just can’t ignore and might want to attend to later. Continue with your meditation for as long as is comfortable for you, breathing slowly throughout to help you stay gently focused. Get out of bed slowly so as not to ‘jar’ yourself out of meditation. Take a few moments to yawn and stretch to encourage blood flow through the face and body, and then begin to prepare your day.

You will hopefully find that daily morning practice of light meditation assists to create a feeling of calm, focus and positivity ahead of your busy day, and that it soon becomes a habit!

If you find meditation difficult in the beginning, don’t worry, and be assured that even experienced meditators have their good and bad days. You will notice that I have included all the five senses: sight, sound, taste, touch and hearing. You don’t need to follow my suggested sequence to the letter, as we are all different in how we relate to our five senses. For instance, there is no reason that you cant take a sip (taste) of your tea before looking (sight) into your cup. Over time, work towards keeping the eyes closed as much as possible with the focus on the other sensations as suggested. There is no wrong or right here in terms of sequence. The key issue is to find what keeps YOU in the moment, without your mind wandering off.

Please note that what I have suggested are guidelines based on my previous experience as a yoga practitioner and teacher (please see my About page).

If you are interested in learning more about meditation and in developing a more intensive practice, here are some suggestions Here and Here